Greedy Greek Deli

May 16, 2014 at 5:45 pm | Posted in Deli, Takeaway | 1 Comment
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I’ve been meaning to tick the Greedy Greek Deli on Sharrow Vale Road off my ‘Must Try’ list for a while now, but hadn’t gotten around to it. Probably because said list is so long – and getting longer all the time!

I finally ended up trying the Greedy Greek Deli for the first time on a whim. I was surfing the World Wide Web for some takeout to accompany an afternoon of horror movies, and growing increasingly frustrated that so many places don’t offer delivery until after 5 pm, when I spotted the Greedy Greek Deli in the ‘open for deliveries’ category. It was the perfect excuse to try something new!

The Greedy Greek Deli’s menu is, well greek-themed (surprise, surprise), so expect lots of bread, dips, olives, and feta. The Greedy Greek is one of those places where the takeaway menu is the same as their eat-in menu, so at first glance the prices may seem high for takeout (£7.30 for two stuffed peppers?!) but rest assured, the quality of the food justifies the price. The olives are a perfect example of the thought the Greedy Greek Deli puts into their food, as you can get them stuffed with everything from chilli, to garlic, feta, sundried tomatoes, and even almonds.

My only criticism, is that much of the menu is very similar. If there’s a dish you like the sound of, you can look forward to lots of variations on this theme, but if you don’t spot something tempting within the first few paragraphs, then the rest of the menu probably won’t be to your taste, either. This similarity wasn’t an issue for us, as me and my movie buddy both quickly found something we wanted to try, and placed our order.

Our food arrived pretty sharpish, but I’m not sure whether this is normal for the Greedy Greek, or whether it was because we’d ordered our takeaway at such a random time. Whatever the reason, speedy delivery is always a plus!

I’d opted for the Vegetarian Mixed Plate Meal; a platter of falafel, halloumi, stuffed vine leaves, olive pate, hummus, salad, pitta bread, and chips. For £12.40, this sounded like a decent amount of grub, not to mention a chance to sample lots of different things that the Greedy Greek has to offer.

First up, was the salad. Not only did I get a decent portion of salad, but it came with olives and chunks of feta, neither of which I’d been expecting. A lot of restaurants use salad as a cheap way of filling up your plate, but this clearly isn’t the case with the Greedy Greek. In addition to the surprise olives and feta, my salad consisted of chopped peppers, tomatoes, and a variety of green leaves – no boring old iceberg lettuce here!

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I’d always thought I wasn’t a fan of salads – clearly, I’ve just been eating the wrong kind of salad.

When it came to the falafel, I’d been expecting a few pieces, but what I got was a huge portion of super-sized falafel. I’ve had falafel sandwiches with less falafel in them! At first glance, I was worried this was a case of quantity over quality, as the falafel looked slightly over-cooked and greasy. However, once I got past the crunchy exterior, the falafel inside was tasty, perfectly cooked, and completely free from grease.

Falafel

Just how filling was my falafel? Well, I actually set some aside, and had a falafel sarnie later in the afternoon. You know you’re getting your money’s worth, when you’re still eating your deli lunch at dinner time!

The pitta bread was also on the large side (do you see a theme emerging?) and arrived warm, with visible grill marks, which is always a good sign. This nicely-toasted pitta was the perfect accompaniment to the perfectly-seasoned chips, which were so plentiful, they actually took up half my plate!

Greedy Greek Deli chips

The chips were nicely-cooked, and had a crispy skin; after all the dodgy, soggy chip takeaways I’ve had over the years, this was something of a revelation. Greedy Greek Deli, you’ve restored my faith in takeaway chips!

Both the olive pate and the hummus were tasty dips; ideal for adding an extra dash of Greek flavour to my chips and pitta bread.

After so many extra-large servings of extra-nice food, I finally hit a snag. Annoyingly, my issue was with the part of the platter I’d been looking forward to the most: the stuffed vine leaves. The vine leaves themselves were slimy and tasted overwhelmingly of vinegar, and the filling of mushed-up rice had a really weird texture.

Greedy Greek Deli vine leaves

My DVD buddy’s order also included some stuffed vine leaves, and they too expressed dislike for the eye-watering vine leaves and squishy rice filling. Clearly, neither of us are cut out for the world of stuffed vine leaves!

Things improved for the final part of my epic Greek feast, as I tucked into my halloumi. This halloumi may have been a little tough on the outside, but once I chewed through the skin, the halloumi inside was deliciously soft and subtly salty. This was my favourite part of the platter and, luckily for me, there was plenty of halloumi for me to enjoy.

My Greedy Greek Deli platter was a saga of greek delights, where my only real complaint was that the portions were too large, for the type of food involved. The fried falafel, fried halloumi, mountain of chips, and extra-large pitta bread, had me wishing I could trade some of it in for extra salad. I’d order the Vegetarian Mixed Plate Meal again, but only as a sharer. This is a varied, eclectic Greek feast, and a great introduction to the Greedy Greek’s menu – but it’s a bit scary when consumed as a meal for one!

My partner in crime had shown a little more restraint and ordered a Mini Meze of stuffed peppers with feta cheese, olives, sundried tomatoes and stuffed vine leaves (£7.50).

Greedy Greek Deli stuffed peppers

The Greedy Greek seem to be on a mission to ply their customers with as much feta as possible, as not only were the peppers crammed full of feta (as advertised), but there were big chunks of feta on the side, too. That’s a serious amount of cheese!

The peppers themselves were incredibly tart. At first, this was a delicious shock to the tastebuds, but as my friend moved onto the second and third stuffed peppers, the taste of vinegar became overwhelming. With so many peppers to plough through, they’d have preferred a less-is-more approach with the vinegar. They thoroughly enjoyed the sun-dried tomatoes though, which were zingy, and packed an intense, sun-dried flavour, while still retaining a soft and chewy center.

All in all, we enjoyed our Greek Deli experience. The Greedy Greek Deli is all about quality, authentic ingredients, and super-sized portions. If you fancy a change from your usual lunchtime fodder, then the Greedy Greek Deli is well worth a go. I know where I’ll be heading, the next time I fancy a big helping of halloumi, falafel, or salad!

rating-3-star

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Sakushi

June 30, 2012 at 8:32 pm | Posted in Restaurants, Takeaway | 4 Comments
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There’s no denying it: sushi is THE lunchtime treat for when you’re having a tough day at the office. If you’re keeping an eye on the pennies, then the value-for-money Edo Sushi takeaway is the perfect place to grab a box of fishy goodness on the go. But, if you’re hankering after an hour away from the office, then Sakushi is worth a visit for those with a few notes in their back pocket.

Located conveniently on Campo Lane (slap bang across the road from The Wig and Pen, incidentally) Sakushi puts a trendy gloss on the traditional Japanese restaurant. The interior is all sleek, spotless monochrome, white leather booths and super-efficient staff. Sakushi even modernizes the old cliche of the sushi conveyor belt, with pods of sushi sweeping around a stylish steel ornament and past a reassuringly open kitchen. Even though you can grab your meal straight off a conveyor belt, there’s nothing tacky about Sakushi.

The menu is so exhaustive that newcomers to Japanese cuisine are advised to study it online in advance. Not only does Sakushi offer a wide choice of sushi and sashimi, but there’s an equally impressive range of cooked mains and Japanese tapas too. Our party decided to put every section of the menu to the test – sushi, tapas and cooked mains – to bring you the most comprehensive review possible. We’re selfless, like that.

We began our epic feast with sushi. At Sakushi, you have a choice: you can either reach across and yank whatever takes your fancy off the conveyor belt (the colour-coded plates are then stacked up on your table and the staff tot up the total at the end of the meal) or you can order plates of sushi from the menu. Since we’re an impatient lot, we got stuck in with the conveyor belt.

The sushi portion of our feast consisted of a couple of plates of the Mixed Nigiri (£3.80) which featured all our favourites: salmon, prawn and tuna sashimi. Also cherry-picked from the conveyor belt were Tuna Nigiri (£3.30) and Sake Nigiri (£2.30) both of which boasted a generous slab of raw fish, and the Hamachi Nigiri (£3.30.) Made with “yellow tail” the Hamachi Nigiri was a new one on us, but the tanginess of the pale fish won us over – a newfound favourite! The Tako Nigiri (£2.80) divided opinion; the chewy, raw octopus wasn’t to everyone’s palate – personally, I found the taste a little overpowering.

The big hits at our table were the Sakushi Roll (£3.80) which was laced with crunchy tempura batter, the creamy Salmon and Avocado Roll (£2.80), the Spicy Tuna Roll (£3.30) and the Fresh Crab Roll (£3.80) which was jam-packed with shredded crab.

Sushi fanatics, beware: it’s easy to lose track of what you’re spending, especially when you’re sat next to a revolving door of delicious-looking sushi. It’s a good idea to set a limit on how many plates you’re going to have in advance. Needless to say, we didn’t set a strict limit and got carried away…..

But, we’d solemnly sworn to sample the cooked mains and Japanese tapas as well as the sushi. So, loosening our belts we ordered a portion of the Shiitake No Kani (£4.95), shiitake mushrooms and crab in breadcrumbs served with a sprinkling of side salad.

Generously filled with shredded crab, these little balls of goodness had our reviewer raving. Who would have thought shiitake mushrooms and crab meat would be a match made in heaven? Rich and creamy, and highly recommended.

Also arriving at our groaning table, was a big plate of Seafood Yaki (£9.65.) This belly-buster can be ordered with a choice of sauces – traditional Yaki sauce or sweet Teriyaki sauce – and either soba or udon noodles. Our reviewer settled on traditional sauce and udon noodles. In addition to noodles and sauce, the dish contains tiger prawns, crab sticks, calamari, butter fish, mussels and seasonal greens.

The tangy sauce went down well, but we were disappointed by the amount of seafood and felt the £9.65 price tag was a little on the high side for what was essentially a posh stir fry.

Not content with the upteen plates of sushi and sashimi I’d already done away with, I ordered the Chirashi – Don (£11.14) from the main menu; slices of mixed sashimi on a large helping of sushi rice. When it arrived, my mouth dropped open – it looked absolutely amazing.

The sushi rice was sticky and morish, but the sashimi was the real star of the show. The bowl included generous chunks of my favourite sashimi, tuna and salmon, and new-favourite yellow fish, alongside love-it-or-hate-it slices of octopus, a curl of meaty eel and a prawn. All of the sashimi tasted just-pulled-out-of-the-sea fresh, and the dollop of fish roe gave the dish extra bite (although as a massive roe fan I’d have liked an extra few scoops!) The strips of fried tofu skin perfectly complimented the dish, delivering a welcome hit of sweetness whenever the saltiness of the sashimi became overpowering. For a side order, I plumped for a portion of edamame beans (£2.55), which were served lightly steamed and juicy.

The drinks menu was on the pricey side, so we ordered cokes that came in at £2 a pop. For a small glass bottle of the fizzy stuff (not even a full pint!) we still felt this was cheeky – although going out for sushi and sashimi is rarely a cheap experience!

If you’ve got the time to venture out of town, then Yama Sushi is a cheaper alternative and, if it’s just sushi you’re after, then Yama can’t be beaten for the freshness and sheer tastiness of their sushi. However, if it’s a quick, city centre lunchtime treat you’re after, then Sakushi is the place to go – just keep a mental running total of the bill, because Sakushi can quickly turn into a bank-busting lunchbreak.

The Milestone

June 9, 2012 at 6:28 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | 1 Comment
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Despite only ever hearing good things about gastro pub The Milestone, it turns out no-one at Sheffield Eats has actually gotten around to trying it for themselves. Tucked away in a particularly industrial corner of Kelham Island, it’s not a place you’re likely to wander past and decide to pop in. Because it’s off-the-beaten track, you have to make a conscious decision to visit. With so many fantastic eateries lined up in the town centre, is it really worth making a special trip to The Milestone? Judging by the meal we had there this weekend, the answer is a resounding yes.

Located just off Shalesmoor roundabout, The Milestone is perched on the corner of a nondescript road, surrounded by a mish-mash of factories with bricked-up windows and swanky new apartments.

We were advised to book a table for The Milestone’s Saturday lunchtime menu, and it’s a good job we heeded that advice, as by 2PM the place was full. Clearly, there’s no shortage of foodies willing to make a special trip for their lunch.

The Milestone’s decor is a blend of clean, white open space and rustic charm, with plenty of homely prints on the walls and quirky flourishes, such as The Milestone’s twisty staircase and menus printed on fish-and-chip shop brown paper. It’s a pleasant atmosphere that’s completely unpretentious, despite the extravagant menu.

Obviously, the menu isn’t going to be to everyone’s taste. It’s not a million miles removed from haute cuisine, with each dish offering an intricate and thoughtful balance of flavours. It’s the sort of menu where unusual purees, jus and dressings feature heavily. The fish comes with samphire and cauliflower puree, and the 21-day aged beef is served one way: rare.

Excited to discover what had drawn so many people to The Milestone for lunch, I quickly ordered the goat’s cheese and beetroot croquette, which came with fresh garden peas, pea puree, asparagus and a poached egg (£12.95). It arrived at the table meticulously presented but, cynical and hungry, I was dubious whether this daintily-arranged platter could fill up my rumbling tum.

How wrong I was! The croquettes were stuffed with smooth goat’s cheese and the pea puree was unexpectedly creamy. A few bites in and I went from eyeing up the dessert menu, to wondering whether I’d be able to clean my plate.

Although I knew the goat’s cheese croquettes were made with beetroot, I was still surprised when I cut into the first one and was confronted by a bright pink filling. The colour might be off-putting to some, but I was left wondering why I’d never stumbled across this combination before; the beetroot gave the heavy cheese a real zing.

Asparagus can be a tricky vegetable to get right, but The Milestone got it spot-on; it was cooked through without being soggy. Even the salad leaves dotted around the plate had been carefully selected to compliment the rest of the meal; they were delicious mixed up with a forkful of pea puree and runny egg yolk.

An ingenious and expertly put-together plate of flavours and textures, presented with the utmost care. Despite the expert attention to detail, the goat’s cheese and beetroot croquette was still a real gut-buster that left me too stuffed for pudding, and grateful that I hadn’t ordered a starter.

We also ordered The Milestone’s take on the humble burger: an open beef and thyme burger served with horseradish crème fraîche, onion chutney, bread, celeriac coleslaw, rough cut chips and a side salad (£9.50). In contrast to my delicate-looking veggie option, this very upmarket-sounding burger turned out to be an impressive pile of grub.

The beef and thyme meat patty tasted like no burger our reviewer had been served before. A slab of high-quality, perfectly cooked meat, they raved that it was the best burger they’d ever crossed paths with.

The crème fraîche, onion chutney and tangy celeriac coleslaw were inspired accompaniments to this fine hunk of meat. The skin-on chips were served already seasoned with cracked sea salt and vinegar, and as someone with a fondness for skin-on chips, our reviewer was left vowing they’d never eat a french fry again. Crispy and rustic on the outside, and as fluffy as a freshly-baked jacket potato on the inside, The Milestone take the humble chip to the next level.

Unsurprisingly, wine buffs are well catered for at The Milestone. A whole section of the wine list is dedicated to ‘Fine Wines,’ which range from £31.50 to a bank-breaking £100. If you’re not a big-time wine connoisseur, there are cheaper options. We opted for a bottle of sauvignon blanc at £18.50, which went down a treat.

For those who are open-minded about food and who are excited, rather than overwhelmed by a riot of flavours squeezed onto a single plate, The Milestone is for you. Although this isn’t the sort of place you frequent on a regular basis, a meal here is an experience. A trip to The Milestone feels like a special occasion, right down to the off-the-beaten track location.

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