Sakushi

June 30, 2012 at 8:32 pm | Posted in Restaurants, Takeaway | 4 Comments
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There’s no denying it: sushi is THE lunchtime treat for when you’re having a tough day at the office. If you’re keeping an eye on the pennies, then the value-for-money Edo Sushi takeaway is the perfect place to grab a box of fishy goodness on the go. But, if you’re hankering after an hour away from the office, then Sakushi is worth a visit for those with a few notes in their back pocket.

Located conveniently on Campo Lane (slap bang across the road from The Wig and Pen, incidentally) Sakushi puts a trendy gloss on the traditional Japanese restaurant. The interior is all sleek, spotless monochrome, white leather booths and super-efficient staff. Sakushi even modernizes the old cliche of the sushi conveyor belt, with pods of sushi sweeping around a stylish steel ornament and past a reassuringly open kitchen. Even though you can grab your meal straight off a conveyor belt, there’s nothing tacky about Sakushi.

The menu is so exhaustive that newcomers to Japanese cuisine are advised to study it online in advance. Not only does Sakushi offer a wide choice of sushi and sashimi, but there’s an equally impressive range of cooked mains and Japanese tapas too. Our party decided to put every section of the menu to the test – sushi, tapas and cooked mains – to bring you the most comprehensive review possible. We’re selfless, like that.

We began our epic feast with sushi. At Sakushi, you have a choice: you can either reach across and yank whatever takes your fancy off the conveyor belt (the colour-coded plates are then stacked up on your table and the staff tot up the total at the end of the meal) or you can order plates of sushi from the menu. Since we’re an impatient lot, we got stuck in with the conveyor belt.

The sushi portion of our feast consisted of a couple of plates of the Mixed Nigiri (£3.80) which featured all our favourites: salmon, prawn and tuna sashimi. Also cherry-picked from the conveyor belt were Tuna Nigiri (£3.30) and Sake Nigiri (£2.30) both of which boasted a generous slab of raw fish, and the Hamachi Nigiri (£3.30.) Made with “yellow tail” the Hamachi Nigiri was a new one on us, but the tanginess of the pale fish won us over – a newfound favourite! The Tako Nigiri (£2.80) divided opinion; the chewy, raw octopus wasn’t to everyone’s palate – personally, I found the taste a little overpowering.

The big hits at our table were the Sakushi Roll (£3.80) which was laced with crunchy tempura batter, the creamy Salmon and Avocado Roll (£2.80), the Spicy Tuna Roll (£3.30) and the Fresh Crab Roll (£3.80) which was jam-packed with shredded crab.

Sushi fanatics, beware: it’s easy to lose track of what you’re spending, especially when you’re sat next to a revolving door of delicious-looking sushi. It’s a good idea to set a limit on how many plates you’re going to have in advance. Needless to say, we didn’t set a strict limit and got carried away…..

But, we’d solemnly sworn to sample the cooked mains and Japanese tapas as well as the sushi. So, loosening our belts we ordered a portion of the Shiitake No Kani (£4.95), shiitake mushrooms and crab in breadcrumbs served with a sprinkling of side salad.

Generously filled with shredded crab, these little balls of goodness had our reviewer raving. Who would have thought shiitake mushrooms and crab meat would be a match made in heaven? Rich and creamy, and highly recommended.

Also arriving at our groaning table, was a big plate of Seafood Yaki (£9.65.) This belly-buster can be ordered with a choice of sauces – traditional Yaki sauce or sweet Teriyaki sauce – and either soba or udon noodles. Our reviewer settled on traditional sauce and udon noodles. In addition to noodles and sauce, the dish contains tiger prawns, crab sticks, calamari, butter fish, mussels and seasonal greens.

The tangy sauce went down well, but we were disappointed by the amount of seafood and felt the £9.65 price tag was a little on the high side for what was essentially a posh stir fry.

Not content with the upteen plates of sushi and sashimi I’d already done away with, I ordered the Chirashi – Don (£11.14) from the main menu; slices of mixed sashimi on a large helping of sushi rice. When it arrived, my mouth dropped open – it looked absolutely amazing.

The sushi rice was sticky and morish, but the sashimi was the real star of the show. The bowl included generous chunks of my favourite sashimi, tuna and salmon, and new-favourite yellow fish, alongside love-it-or-hate-it slices of octopus, a curl of meaty eel and a prawn. All of the sashimi tasted just-pulled-out-of-the-sea fresh, and the dollop of fish roe gave the dish extra bite (although as a massive roe fan I’d have liked an extra few scoops!) The strips of fried tofu skin perfectly complimented the dish, delivering a welcome hit of sweetness whenever the saltiness of the sashimi became overpowering. For a side order, I plumped for a portion of edamame beans (£2.55), which were served lightly steamed and juicy.

The drinks menu was on the pricey side, so we ordered cokes that came in at £2 a pop. For a small glass bottle of the fizzy stuff (not even a full pint!) we still felt this was cheeky – although going out for sushi and sashimi is rarely a cheap experience!

If you’ve got the time to venture out of town, then Yama Sushi is a cheaper alternative and, if it’s just sushi you’re after, then Yama can’t be beaten for the freshness and sheer tastiness of their sushi. However, if it’s a quick, city centre lunchtime treat you’re after, then Sakushi is the place to go – just keep a mental running total of the bill, because Sakushi can quickly turn into a bank-busting lunchbreak.

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Edo Sushi

May 27, 2012 at 2:21 pm | Posted in Takeaway | 1 Comment
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Tucked out of sight on High Court Chambers (just next to Pizza Hut on Sheffield High Street) Edo Sushi specializes in sushi, sashimi and assorted cooked Japanese dishes to take away. Although off the main road, it draws a devoted lunchtime crowd. If you’re planning to pick up their lunchtime special ‘Edo Sushi Box,’ make sure you’re there at the start of the lunch hour. The staff make up some boxes in advance, but they always sell out fast. Thankfully, if you’re slow off the mark the helpful staff are more than happy to put together your box as you wait – you can’t get any fresher than that! Usually priced at £5.50, nab one of these boxes during your lunch break and the staff not only knock £1 off, but they throw in either a miso soup or a green tea, to boot.

As you’ve probably already guessed, it was Edo Sushi Boxes that had us shooting out of the office at 12 noon on the dot this week. Getting there early meant we plucked our boxes straight off the shelf.

For a takeout meal, Edo Sushi Boxes are smartly presented and come with pickled ginger and soy sauce on the side. The specials change on a monthly basis, but there are some familiar faces that keep cropping up. Expect to see plenty of shinko maki, a veggie sushi roll made from tangy pickled radish, and kappa maki, the cucumber-filled equivalent. Creamy avocado and salmon-filled california rolls are also a staple. The Edo Sushi Box is finished off with one larger item, usually either inari zushi, or if you’re lucky one of their mouth-watering salmon nigiris.

The staff at Edo Sushi are friendly and efficient; even if they have to knock up your lunchtime sushi fix from scratch you’ll rarely be waiting longer than ten minutes. The takeaway itself is pokey; you’ll find yourself awkwardly squeezing around other customers during the lunchtime rush, but this is all part of Edo Sushi’s charm. There’s plenty of personal touches that’ll have you warming to the place in no time, including greeting cards hand-drawn by the staff and a cheerful note telling you to put your money in their lucky cat moneybox if you want to buy a card. The eagle-eyed will also notice a painting by Sheffield’s own Wildago hanging on the wall.

But ultimately, it’s all about the sushi! Our Edo Sushi Boxes were made up of shinko maki, kappa maki, california rolls and a wedge of inari zushi. Edo Sushi do have a tendency to skimp on the fish (5 pieces of our sushi were just cucumber and pickled radish rolls) but at £4.50, this is understandable.

The inari zushi will divide opinions. Personally, the combination of sweet tofu and savoury rice wasn’t to my liking, and I ended up peeling off the batter and just eating the plain rice. But other members of the Sheffield Eats team raved about it, and the tofu was certainly perfectly cooked, forming a light skin around the rice.

While you’ll either love or hate the inari zushi, sushi lovers are guaranteed to wolf down the california rolls. Our boxes contained six helpings of california rolls, which were crammed with melt-in-the-mouth avocado and fresh, raw salmon. It’s worth shelling out on the box just for these six mouthfuls of sharp sashimi and smooth avocado alone! Delicious, and surely some of the freshest sashimi you’ll ever pluck off a shelf during your lunch break.

The meal was topped off with a complimentary miso soup. Although it may look like a murky cup-a-soup in a polystyrene cup, it’s not to be missed.

This lip-smackingly salty soup has hidden layers of seaweed and crispy spring onion, and is the perfect accompaniment to sushi.

The next time you’re craving a lunchtime sushi fix, do yourself a favour and track down this takeout sushi haven. It’s cheaper, fresher and far, far tastier than any of the prepackaged stuff you’ll find in the big stores in town.

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