The Devonshire Cat

December 8, 2016 at 8:48 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | Leave a comment
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Back in the day, the Devonshire Cat used to be my go-to place for pre-Corporation drinks – because if you’re going to spend 30 minutes queued up in the cold, then you need something to keep you going!

Despite this, I’d never actually eaten at the Devonshire Cat before, so when I heard that they’d just finished refurbing the Wellington Street venue, I was excited to see how the new-look Devonshire Cat compared to my (slightly fuzzy) pre-Corp memories. Plus, they’d just launched a brand new menu, and I’m always up for checking out a new menu!

The newly-renovated Devonshire Cat feels much lighter and more open than before, which is a welcome change, because the Dev Cat was always nice, but it did used to feel a bit on the dark side.

devonshire-cat

Turns out, the Devonshire Cat’s new menu is perfect for this time of year, as it’s packed with comfort food and seasonal favourites. And since the Dev Cat is best known for its huge range of bottled beers and real ales, it’s great to see them continue this theme across their food, with a menu that features plenty of booze-infused treats including mussels in wheat beer broth, chicken thighs roasted in Heathen pale ale, and Absolution battered cod.

I kicked off my three course meal with something suitably wintry: a warm salad of red cabbage, beetroot, apple and goat’s cheese (£4.75).

dev-cat-red-warm-salad

For the price, this is a generous portion, and the goat’s cheese gives this salad an indulgent feel (if only this could be said of all salads!) The beetroot was fresh, rather than pickled, which means this salad has a really unique, woody flavour that contrasts nicely with the rich, creamy goat’s cheese. This is a great vegetarian starter!

Meanwhile, my friend had opted for the honey and ginger chicken wings, which were served with homemade ketchup (£5.50).

dev-cat-chicken-wings

The homemade ketchup was packed with flavour and had a nice kick to it. The chicken wings did have a hint of ginger and honey to them, but my friend did say they’d have preferred these wings to pack more of a punch when it came to the ginger and honey.

Onto the mains, and surely I can’t be the only one who’s fed up of seeing the same 2-3 vegetarian options on every pub menu? There’s only so many times you can order a veggie wellington, mac and cheese, veggie burger or vegetarian lasagna, before you start craving something a bit more exciting – or at least something different!

So I was pleasantly surprised to see that the Devonshire Cat have clearly put as much thought into their vegetarian meals, as they have the rest of their menu.

In the end, I wound up ordering the roast chestnuts and wild mushroom cottage pie, which came with braised red cabbage and green beans (£8.95). This might just be one of the tastiest-sounding vegetarian meals I’ve ever seen on a pub menu!

dev-cat-chestnut-and-mushroom-cottage-pie

Chestnuts are my all-time favourite Christmas treat anyway, to the point where I actually named my childhood hamster after them (RIP Chestnut). As it turns out, the only thing better than roast chestnuts, are chestnuts and wild mushrooms smothered in mashed potatoes. If you’re craving something to warm you up on a cold day, then this is it!

Despite almost being swayed by the Devonshire Cat’s Sunday roast, when it came to their main course my dining companion wound up ordering the Absolution-battered cod, double-cooked chips, mushy peas and homemade tartar sauce (£9.95).

This is an enormous plate of food!

dev-cat-fish-and-chips

The fish was perfectly cooked so it practically fell apart, and the homemade tartar sauce was every bit as good as the homemade ketchup – clearly the Devonshire Cat know to knock up a cracking sauce!

The only slight disappointment were the mushy peas, which had somehow managed to set – these were mushy peas that were seriously missing the “mushy!”

But, non-mushy peas aside, this is huge, tasty meal that’s guaranteed to please the fish and chips fan in your life.

Finally it was time to check out the dessert menu, and although I don’t have much of a sweet tooth one thing on the menu did catch my eye – the rice pudding!

This is a proper oldschool dessert that you don’t often see on menus, plus it was absolutely freezing outside, and what better way to warm up than stuffing yourself with some piping hot rice pudding? So even though I had serious doubts about whether I had any room for dessert, I ended up ordering what our waiter later confirmed was the biggest, stodgiest pudding on the menu. Whoops!

The Devonshire Cat’s rice pudding is served with homemade plum and honey jam, topped with honeycomb pieces (£4.50). According to the menu, all the honey is supplied by the Sheffield Honey Company – it’s always great to see pubs and restaurants sourcing ingredients locally!

Let’s just get one thing out of the way first – I love rice pudding, but there’s no denying that it looks like frogspawn, so even with the best will in the world, this is never going to be the most photogenic of puddings!

dev-cat-rice-pudding

But, photography woes aside, the Devonshire Cat’s rice pudding tastes fantastic. I particularly loved the plum and honey jam, which struck a perfect balance between sweet and tart. My only complaint is that there just wasn’t enough jam for such a huge portion of rice pudding – I wanted more!

When I’d first spotted rice pudding on the menu, I’d been particularly excited at the prospect of trying honeycomb – in my head I’d been picturing those big chunks of straight-from-the-beehive honeycomb that you sometimes see suspended in jars of posh honey. Turns out I was on completely the wrong track, as the honeycomb that arrived was more like honeycomb toffee. As someone who has more than their fair share of fillings, chewing my way through this incredibly tough, sticky honeycomb was a bit of a nerve-wracking experience, but it was tasty enough to risk losing a filling or two!  

Rice pudding is pretty stodgy to begin with, and this is a massive portion, so just a friendly warning: only order this if you’re seriously hungry!

My friend had opted for something equally seasonal: pumpkin pie with pistachio brittle, homemade marshmallows, and Bradwells vanilla ice cream (£4.75).

Unlike my rice pudding, this dessert definitely had the ‘wow’ factor!

dev-cat-pumpkin-pie

Not only did this pie look great, but the pastry was light and crumbly, and the pumpkin filling had a lovely velvety texture, making this a winning dessert.

All in all, I love the Devonshire Cat’s new menu, particularly since they’re not content to serve the usual staples; even putting their own spin on all-time pub grub classics like fish and chips (which the Devonshire Cat serve in Absolution batter).  

This is also a very seasonal menu that’s perfect for the colder months, so if you do find yourself in the city center on a cold day (perhaps you’re doing some panic-stricken, last minute Christmas shopping?) then I’d definitely recommend making the whole experience less painful by treating yourself to some warming food at the Devonshire Cat.

four-stars

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Wick at Both Ends

May 22, 2016 at 5:43 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | 1 Comment
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Big changes are afoot at the Wick at Both Ends. Although I’ve been lucky enough to attend a few Wick menu launches, this is probably the most dramatic menu change I’ve ever seen from the Wick at Both Ends.

Not only is their new menu completely different (more on that in a moment) but after chatting to some of the Wick’s staff it became clear that their opening hours and kitchen staff are different, too. The Wick no longer opens during the day Monday-Friday, and as someone who doesn’t work the traditional Monday-Friday, 9-5, that makes me pretty sad. Secondly, they have a completely new kitchen team, which may explain why the new menu is so, well, new.

I didn’t get the chance to look at the Wick’s latest menu in advance, so I was a bit surprised when I arrived and was handed a single-sheet menu divided into Snacks, Bar Bites, Small Plates and Sweets – not a main course in sight!

Since the Wick have done away with main courses completely, this also means that the day has finally come: they’ve taken their goat’s cheese and flat field mushroom burger off the menu, which was my favourite. This makes me sadder than it probably should.  

We decided to start by seeing what the Bar Bites were all about. I went for Spiced Hummus, Sumac and Flatbread (£3.50).

wick at both ends hummus

This is fantastic value for money – just look at all that hummus! If you’re feeling peckish after one too many Wick cocktails, then this would be perfect to order for yourself, or you could even share it with a friend as there’s more than enough hummus to go around.

Despite being described as “spiced hummus,” I didn’t find this particularly spicy, so I do wish the hummus packed more of a punch! Interestingly, the hummus seems to have been made with peanut butter, as it has that thick, smooth and distinctly peanut butter texture. This made it the perfect consistency for spreading on the accompanying slices of bread, which had been toasted to crunchy perfection.

This is a seriously filling, and very tasty snack, with more than enough hummus and bread to share, if you’re feeling generous.

My friend went for Bacon Jam, Apple and Sourdough (£5.00).

wick at both ends bacon jam

The bacon jam was seriously salty, but that worked well with the refreshing, crisp slivers of green apple. Once again, this is great value for money, and for a humble bar snack, it was really nicely presented.

We also wanted to see what the Small Plates were all about, so we ordered a round of these, as well. My friend picked the Blade of Beef, Enoki Mushroom, Onion and Dashi (£7.00), and once again the Wick deserve top marks for presentation!  

wick at both ends blade of beef

Randomly, the onions were the best thing on this plate, which may have something to do with the dashi. Dashi isn’t something I’m familiar with, but according to good old Google it’s a Japanese broth that forms the basis of miso soup (yum, yum) which might explain why these onions were so strong, and so delicious.

For the price, there was a good amount of beef on the plate, although my friend said the beef was a bit more well done than they’d have liked.

For my small plate, I’d gone for the Sea Trout, with Camomile Butter, Sorrel and Leeks (£7.00). Yet again, the Wick put that little extra bit of effort into their presentation.

wick at both ends sea trout

The trout was cooked to perfection; it was tender and juicy and fell apart the second I cut into it. The accompanying camomile butter had melted into an indulgent, flavour-packed sauce. Even better, the trout and leeks had been sat soaking in this sauce, so they’d absorbed all those delicious, buttery flavours. The leeks in particular were melt-in-the-mouth soft and oozing with yummy melted butter. Why can’t all veggies be served in lashings of camomile butter?

My only complaint is that there isn’t an option to have the trout and leeks as a main meal, because I’d devour a full-sized portion of this!

The latest menu from the Wick doesn’t feel so much like a new menu, as it does a new direction for the Wick at Both Ends. The Wick may have been serving tapas-style small plates for a while now, but it’s always been alongside more traditional main meals, and the focus on nibbles and bar snacks is completely new.

This menu seems to be designed to tempt you into ordering some snacks to go with your drinks, rather than getting you to book a table and head to the Wick for dinner. As someone who’s prone to the beer munchies, I can imagine nipping into the Wick for a few drinks and being tempted by a few things off the Snacks and Bar Bites section, particularly since it’s such good value for money.

It’s also nice to see a restaurant being more experimental with their nibbles, because there’s only so many times you can share a bowl of chips, onion rings, or nachos with toppings, before you start craving something a little bit different.

Not going to lie though, I wish they’d kept that burger!

rating-3-star

Rhubarb and Mustard

May 2, 2016 at 12:12 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | Leave a comment
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Walking down Ecclesall Road a few months back, I was surprised to see that Smith and Jones is no more, and in its place is a new restaurant: Rhubarb and Mustard.

Once I got home, I wasted no time looking up their website and found a sample menu packed full of unusual ‘gastro pub’ style ingredients such as nettle puree, blood orange gel, squid ink puree, and honeycomb and pistachio dukkah. Rhubarb and Mustard’s menu isn’t a million miles removed from the Wig and Pen, or the Milestone. I love both of these restaurants so I knew I had to give Rhubarb and Mustard a try.

It was a rainy weekday evening when I finally made it to Rhubarb and Mustard. Despite the fact that it was a school night and a miserable, drizzly evening to boot, there were quite a few people tucking into delicious-looking Rhubarb and Mustard grub, which is always a good sign.

Me and my friend fancied something to snack on before our main meals, so we decided to share a starter. The waiter took our order and then immediately returned with some complimentary homemade breads and dips, which were delicious and vanished in no time at all. A freebie is always appreciated, especially when it’s this tasty!

bread and dip

When our starter arrived, it became clear that Rhubarb and Mustard is the kind of restaurant that serves small, perfectly formed portions rather than food that’s going to leave you stuffed. The Salt and Pepper Squid (£7) was a lot smaller than I’d been expecting.

rhubarb and mustard squid starter

Despite feeling pretty conspicuous, sat there sharing such a small plate of food, the salt and pepper squid was fantastic. The squid was perfectly cooked, so it was really tender and juicy, and the batter was light, crumbly and had a delicious salt and pepper taste.

The squid was served with a Thai-inspired slaw that had a satisfying crunch, a light and zesty creme fraiche, and a handful of cashew nuts. The whole thing was finished off with a helping of homemade sweet chilli jam that had a serious kick, and worked really well with the cooling creme fraiche.

Sure, for £7 this isn’t a lot of food, but this is definitely a case of quality over quantity, so the salt and pepper squid feels like it’s well worth the £7. I would order this again – I just wouldn’t order it to share, as there’s not nearly enough salt and pepper squid to go around.

Onto the mains, and me and my friend committed the cardinal sin of food blogging and ordered the exact same thing. Not ideal when you’re checking out a restaurant for the first time, but neither of us could resist Rhubarb and Mustard’s incredible-sounding Scallop and Crab Burger (£17).

rhubarb and mustard scallop and crab

Straight away, I’ve got to say that £17 is a lot to pay for a burger, but one bite and I was in a seafood lover’s paradise! The burger patty tastes like pure scallop and crab meat, with no filler, and is possibly one of the strongest and most delicious seafood-based things I’ve ever tasted.

And the big flavours continued as the patty was topped with a salad that’s pretty much all coriander. There was also a sprinkling of coriander on top of the brioche bun, finely-sliced coriander on the chunky chips, and flakes of coriander scattered across the plate, just for good measure. Pretty much every mouthful had coriander lurking in there somewhere, so don’t order this if you’re not a coriander fan!

The crab and scallop patty is served in a tasty brioche bun and comes with two sauces: a vegetable relish that was a bit on the bland side, and a fiery sriracha chilli that I just couldn’t get enough of. This is the kind of chilli sauce that you suspect might be doing your tastebuds some permanent damage.

This scallop and crab burger is all about those big, bold flavours: from the searing chilli sauce, to the seafood burger patty, to the great big handfuls of coriander that seem to be lurking in every bite. This is the kind of burger you’ll either love or hate. I love strong flavours, so this was right up my street, although it wouldn’t hurt Rhubarb and Mustard to cut back on the coriander.

Would I pay another visit to Rhubarb and Mustard? Yes but only for a special treat, as the prices are on the steep side. Rhubarb and Mustard is one of the more expensive eateries on Ecclesall Road, but the higher prices make sense considering their gastro pub-style menu.

If you’re a fan of venues such as the Milestone and the Wig and Pen, then you’ll definitely want to check out Rhubarb and Mustard.

rating-3-star

The Harley

April 23, 2016 at 8:54 am | Posted in Pub Grub, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Burgers are no longer just something you grab from a takeaway on your way home after a night out. Over the past few years, everyone’s favourite fast food has become a lot more exciting, to the point where there’s a few Sheffield venues that specialise in burgers, such as Bungalows and Bears, Urban ¼ and, of course, the Harley.

I love a good burger, so when the Harley asked if I wanted to come and try their new burger menu, I jumped at the chance.

The format of this particular menu tasting was a bit different, as the staff brought out wave after wave of side orders for everyone sampling the new menu to share, plus lots of burgers cut into handy, bite-sized quarters. So don’t judge me for all the burgers and sides I’m talking about in this review, because I only had a taste of each of them! 

The first order of business was to try the Harley’s new Twisted sauces. This is a trio of vegan sauces made in collaboration with Sheffield clothing label Drop Dead.

sauces

Out of the three sauces on offer, my hands-down favourite was the Techno sauce which is a tangy burger sauce made with Henderson’s Relish. This sauce has a complex and unique flavour that’s difficult to put your finger on, but is all kinds of delicious. I’ve been hooked on the Harley’s Techno sauce ever since I got my first taste of it on the breakfast McMuffin they used to serve at the weekends (something that sadly seems to have disappeared from the menu, boo!)

The second sauce was Jalapeno Salsa, which is perfect for spicing up your fries and burgers if you have a soft spot for hot food. The Twisted Jalapeno Sauce also has a tangy note that makes it a little bit different (and in my opinion, much tastier) than your typical straight-up spicy salsa.

The final sauce was the Twisted BBQ sauce which has an interesting list of ingredients – tequila, chocolate and Henderson’s Relish, anyone? This is a tasty twist on your bogstandard BBQ sauce.

And if there’s a Twisted sauce that you just can’t get enough of, you can purchase all three sauces from Drop Dead’s website. Needless to say, I foresee a bottle of Techno sauce landing on my doorstep in the very near future!

The Harley provided two sets of chips for the purpose of putting these sauces to the test: the standard Harley house fries (£1.25 for a single portion, £2.25 for a sharing portion) and sweet potato fries (an additional £2). I’ve always loved the Harley’s fries as they have a nice, spicy kick to them, but this is the first time I’ve tried their sweet potato fries. Turns out they’re even better, so I’ll be definitely upgrading to sweet potato fries from now on!

fries and sauces.jpeg

Sauces sampled, it was time to move onto the burgers and sides. First up, was Return of the Mac (£6.95).

return of the mac

The Return of the Mac is a double bacon patty burger with mac and cheese, plus a helping of homemade pesto. The bacon patty is a bit of a weird concept, but it’s a weirdness that works, and the mac and cheese doesn’t skimp on the cheese, making this a winning burger.

If you do order the Return of the Mac, then try it with a splash of the Twisted BBQ sauce as it goes really well with this particular burger.

Next up was a side order of Highway to Falafel (£3.50).

highway to falafel

Out of everything I tried from the Harley’s new menu (and I tried a lot) these falafel balls were the one thing I wouldn’t order again. They’re a lot tougher and crunchier than any falafel I’ve tried before, which I wasn’t keen on. And as someone who doesn’t have much of a sweet tooth, I also wasn’t wild about the accompanying coconut and coriander dip, which was seriously sweet. I did swap this pot for another helping of Techno sauce (yep, I’m addicted) and that made these falafel balls much more to my taste, but I’m still not convinced.

Things quickly got back on track as I spied something seriously exciting coming out of the kitchen: Jalapeno Business Fries (£4.75).

jalapeno business fries

The Harley’s Business Fries are a massive portion of chips, smothered in cheese, guacamole, sour cream, house relish, diced jalapenos and lots of cajun seasoning, garnished with a whole grilled chilli. The Jalapeno Business Fries are my favourite thing to order from the Harley, so I was glad to see they’d survived the menu change. If you’re a spice fan, then you need to try these fries!  

If you’re not a massive chilli head but you still fancy stuffing yourself with a humongous portion of Harley fries smothered in lots of sauce, then you may want to opt for the Big Pimpin’ Fries (£5.50) instead.

Big pimpin’ fries

These Big Pimpin’ Fries are another super-sized portion of Harley fries, but this time topped with lots of juicy pulled pork, manchego sauce, Twisted BBQ sauce and guacamole.

Back to burgers, and next up was the Bury Me in Smoked Sausage (£7.95).

bury me in smoked sausage.jpg

This burger teams a double chicken patty with smoked sausage, creole mayo, monterey jack and red onion gherkins. The sausage had a lovely smoky flavour and the gherkins added a nice contrast in terms of taste and texture.

Sticking with chicken, the next side was Hang up the Chicken Habit (£3.50) aka confit chicken wings served with a blue cheese dip.

confit chicken wings.jpeg

These wings were crispy and surprisingly grease-free, with a good amount of meat on each wing. They were strongly seasoned with lots of salt and pepper, plus a generous helping of jalapenos which gave these wings a nice kick. The accompanying blue cheese dip went perfectly with these salty, peppery, spicy wings, but it also doubles up as a great dip for your chips if you fancy a change from all those strong Twisted sauces.

Next up was a truly gut-busting burger: the triple-cheese Cheesy Rider (£6.95).

Cheesy Rider.jpeg

This veggie burger basically replaces the traditional meat patty with cheese, then adds more cheese on top, and finishes the whole thing off with an extra-large helping of cheese sauce. Specifically, you get a double halloumi patty, plus monterey jack, plus manchego cheese sauce – that’s a serious amount of cheese!

I love cheese, so I quickly devoured my quarter of the Cheesy Rider, but I’m not sure I could have managed the other three quarters. This is a seriously heavy burger!

As I’ve already mentioned, the Twisted sauces are all vegan friendly, so it’s no surprise that the Harley also have a vegan burger on their menu.

Drop Dead Twisted BBQ burger.jpg

The Twisted Barbecue Burger (£7.95) consists of a double “meat” patty, a vegan “cheese” slice, plus BBQ jackfruit and Twisted BBQ sauce.

I’m not a vegan and I haven’t really tried that many vegan alternatives, but I loved this burger! The “meat” patty had a really strong, savoury flavour, and not only was the vegan cheese a tasty substitute for the dairy equivalent, but it also had an authentic cheese texture. 

To put this vegan burger to the ultimate test, I convinced my meat-eating friend to take a bite, and they agreed that this is one of the best burgers on the Harley’s new menu. I’d actually have to take this one step further and say this is the best burger on the Harley’s new menu.

Regardless of whether you’re veggie, vegan or omnivore, the Twisted Barbecue Burger is definitely worth ordering.

Moving beyond the vegan burger, the Twisted sauces are all fantastic, the Jalapeno Business Fries are every bit as delicious as they’ve always been, and there’s a good selection of tasty meat-based burgers on the menu too – especially the Return of the Mac.

I’ll definitely be popping in for my fix of Twisted Barbecue Burger with Techno sauce, plus Jalapeno Business Fries for as long as they remain on the menu.

rating-3-star

The Wick at Both Ends: Spring/Summer 2015

May 4, 2015 at 5:24 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | Leave a comment
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This review is long overdue, due to my phone going whappy and losing all my photos – including those I took at the Wick at Both Ends’ new menu launch.

Thankfully my phone is now back up and running, so I can (finally) share my thoughts on the Wick’s new spring/summer menu!

The new menu has the same rustic, gastro pub feel of previous Wick menus, although there does seem to be more meat and fish this time around. The Wick at Both Ends haven’t completely forgotten about vegetarians, though – there are a couple of veggie-friendly mains inbetween all the ox tail and kidney pies, sausage and mash, and butter roasted plaice. There’s also a selection of meat-free sandwiches, plus the Wick’s trusty flat field mushroom and goat’s cheese burger, which has been my favourite thing to order there for years. If the Wick ever get rid of their mushroom burger, I’ll be very sad.

One thing I’ve noticed about the Wick’s menus, is that the starters tend to be more adventurous than the mains. The spring/summer menu is no exception, featuring unusual starters such as pan fried calves liver, pickled mackerel, and pistachio and prune terrine.

One starter that really caught my eye was the warm potted crab (£5.50). I love potted shrimp but I’ve never tried potted crab before, so I knew I had to give this a go.

This is a big starter!

the wick at both ends potted crab

My ramekin was jam-packed with lots of fresh and tasty crab meat that had a lovely, velvety texture. If you’re not a fan of strong seafood then you should probably give this one a miss, as the crab is seriously strong.

My only issue with the potted crab is that it’s just so filling! After I’d used the accompanying slices of bread and butter to scrape up every last morsel of delicious crab, I was left wondering how I was going to find room for my main course.

This is such a generous portion that I think the potted crab would work really well as a stand alone snack – possibly after one too many Wick cocktails have given you a case of the beer munchies!

For a seafood fanatic like myself, this potted crab starter felt like the ultimate treat. In fact, I have a few seafood-loving friends who I’m going to drag to the Wick at the earliest opportunity, because I know they’ll love this starter every bit as much as I did.

For my main course, I continued the fish and seafood theme with some Smoked Haddock Kedgeree (£8.95).

This wasn’t just the first time I’d had kedgeree at the Wick, it was the first time I’d had kedgeree ever, so I was really looking forward to trying something completely new.

The Wick’s vibrant yellow kedgeree is certainly nice to look at.

wick at both ends kedgeree

I’d found the potted crab a bit heavy going, but this kedgeree was even richer. This is another massive portion, and the rice is really rich and creamy. Like the potted crab, this is food strictly for those who enjoy strong, fishy flavours.

Even though I was getting uncomfortably full, I just couldn’t stop eating this. The Wick’s kedgeree really is too good to waste.

Meanwhile, my friend had opted for the 8oz Onglet Steak (£11.50), which was another new addition to the Wick’s menu.

After some Googling it became clear that onglet steak is the same as hanger steak, which they’ve also just started serving at the Wick’s sister venue, Anchorage (if you’re interested, Anchorage’s hanger steak is amazing and you can read about it here).

The Wick’s onglet steak has a really intense, rich flavour. If you like your steak, then you need to try this onglet/hanger cut, as it’s stronger and tastier than your average steak.

wick at both ends onglet

The onglet steak came with a stack of chubby, perfectly-seasoned chips, a super-sized serving of parsley butter, and a token bit of greenery in the form of some grilled baby gem lettuce. These are all pretty standard sides when you order a steak, but then the Wick throw a curveball by adding a single battered oyster to the plate.

The oyster was nicely cooked and had a really intense flavour (this seems to be a theme with the Wick’s new menu!) but there’s no getting around the fact that this is more batter than oyster.

Now, I know that for £11.50 you can’t expect such a fantastic steak, fat chips and a pile of oysters, and yes oysters are always going to look smaller with the shell removed – but this single battered oyster did look a bit odd on its own.

wick at both ends battered oyster

Despite mixed feelings about the battered oyster, the onglet steak was well received, and for the price you do get a big plateful of grub and a superb cut of meat.

The Wick’s latest menu continues the tradition of big portions of quality food at reasonable prices, with a few quirky ingredients thrown into the mix. The starters are on the pricier side, but my potted crab starter was worth every penny.

The Wick is one of my favourite places to grab a bite to eat in the city centre, and judging by how much I loved their kedgeree and potted crab starter, this isn’t about to change anytime soon.

If you haven’t already, you can check out the Wick’s new menu online.

four stars

Anchorage: Sunday Lunch

March 21, 2015 at 6:14 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | 3 Comments
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I’ve eaten at Anchorage in West One Plaza a few times before and have always enjoyed it, so when I realised they did Sunday dinners too, I knew I had to give them a bash.

Sunday lunch is something I always enjoy, but rarely cook for myself (far too much washing up for my liking) so a city center venue offering Sunday lunch is always something worth getting excited about. I was particularly intrigued by Anchorage’s menu, as it hinted at an American twist on the traditional Sunday roast.

Unfortunately, I had a bit of a mental block and wandered into Anchorage without a reservation on mother’s day. (Just in case you’re wondering, I took my mother out for lunch a few days prior to this, so I didn’t forget about mother’s day completely). Thankfully, I’d been looking forward to my Sunday lunch so much that I’d insisted on getting to Anchorage at 12 o’clock sharp, so we were pretty much the first people there and managed to snag one of the very few tables that weren’t reserved. Phew!

I’ve written about Anchorage before, so I won’t go into detail about the venue here (if you want to read about that, I talk about it my previous Anchorage post). Safe to say it’s a nice place that has some of the Wick at Both Ends‘ quirkiness but with a more polished finish. I feel like you could treat someone to a special meal at Anchorage and it’d go down well  – and judging by all the people celebrating mother’s day there, I’m not the only person who thinks this!

I’d been looking forward to my Sunday lunch all morning, so I didn’t even need to look at the menu – I already knew I’d be ordering the vegetarian Sunday roast. However, my dining companion fancied a starter first, so before I could get my hands on that longed-for Sunday roast, it was time for a glass of white wine and a starter of crispy squid with chipotle mayo (£5.50).

PreviewScreenSnapz001

The batter was light enough that it didn’t overwhelm the squid – always a good thing! The squid was tender and juicy, and the chipotle dip had a tanginess that complimented the squid perfectly. However, the batter did have an unusual, faint flavour that I couldn’t quite put my finger on – and I couldn’t make up my mind whether it was something I liked or not. The jury’s still out on this one!

Then, it was finally time for the Sunday roast I’d been craving.

The menu promised a plateful of nut roast, taters, green beans, squash, lima beans, popovers and veggie gravy (£9.00).

veg Sunday lunch

After some Googling, it became clear that popovers are basically Yorkshire puddings (you learn something everyday). This solved one mystery, but I still wasn’t sure why there were carrots on my plate, when carrots weren’t mentioned on the menu; and the lima beans that had been on the menu, were nowhere to be found.

This wasn’t a big deal for me personally, as given the choice I’d opt for carrots over lima beans anyway, but it would have been nice for the staff to mention this swap when I was placing my order. Who knows, I could have really been looking forward to those lima beans!

Missing lima beans aside, I was really pleased with the size of my roast dinner. For £9.00 this is a big plate of food!

The roast potatoes were fluffy on the inside with a delicious crispy skin, and the Yorkshire pud (or popover, if you prefer) was massive and misshapen – just like all good homemade puds should be.

When it came to the nut roast, I didn’t have high hopes. I love my Sunday dinners, and if you order a vegetarian Sunday dinner then 99% of the time you’re going to end up with a nut roast. It’s just that most of the time, you end up with a dried-out piece of nut roast that tastes like it’s been hanging around the back of the freezer for ages, waiting for the day when someone finally orders a vegetarian roast. Even at its best, to me nut roast just tastes like stuffing – give me an extra helping of roast potatoes or some mash any day!

So I was pleased to discover that Anchorage’s nut roast is actually really good.

This nut roast was far tastier than any stuffing I’ve ever had, and it was perfectly cooked – moist on the inside, with a nicely-roasted exterior. Anchorage were also really generous when it came to portioning out their nut roast, as I got three big patties of the stuff.

I can’t remember ever enjoying a nut roast so much. I even let my meat-loving friend try a forkful of nut roast and they loved the taste, too. Now that’s when you know a nut roast is good!

Anchorage once again nailed the whole vegetarian thing, with their veggie gravy. This kind of gravy can sometimes be a bit thin and anemic-looking, but Anchorage’s was thick and packed with flavour. Good gravy can make everything on a Sunday roast even better, and this gravy certainly did that! The bottom of the Yorkshire pudding/popover was particularly good, as it had been sat soaking in the gravy.

Although we’d originally planned to come to Anchorage for Sunday lunch, my friend opted out of ordering a roast at the last minute, when they spotted a 10oz hanger steak (£14.00) on the menu.

hanger steak

According to the menu, a hanger steak is an unusual cut that butchers traditionally keep for their own table – clearly, butchers have been saving the best for themselves!

hanger steak close up

Anchorage’s hanger steak is an intense and rich cut of meat that’s stronger and far tastier than your average steak. The words “best steak I’ve ever had” were even uttered!

The steak came with a few accompaniments – fries, a rustic slaw that tasted like it was made from celeriac, and a second helping of chipotle mayo. But really, this meal is all about the steak – and Anchorage’s hanger steak was perfection. If you’re the carnivorous sort with a fondness for steak, then you owe it to yourself to try this!

When it comes to Sunday roasts, I really can’t recommend Anchorage enough. They serve big platefuls of pure comfort food that’s seriously filling, and I can see many more Anchorage Sunday dinners in my future. After all, why bother to cook myself a Sunday lunch, when I can just pop to Anchorage and get something this good for £9.00? (And no washing up, either!)

This is easily the best Sunday roast I’ve had in a long time, and the hanger steak looked incredible. I can’t fault Anchorage – and I can’t wait to return!

5-stars

The Lescar

November 29, 2014 at 2:06 pm | Posted in Pub Grub | Leave a comment
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Do you find that yourself drawn to certain pubs, when the weather starts to change?

To me, the Lescar on Sharrow Vale road is an autumnal pub. It’s just one of those places that seems to get more cosy and inviting, the colder it gets outside. The Lescar is all about the real ale, comfort food, and Sunday roasts – a winning combination on a cold autumn day!

The other thing I love about the Lescar, is its ‘friendly local pub’ vibe – right down to the books they provide for customers to browse and borrow. It’s hard to believe this place is just a few minutes walk away from busy Ecclesall Road!

The Lescar is one of those places that’s much bigger than it looks from the outside. It also has a very interesting layout, with different areas that almost feel like they were separate rooms at one point. Just when you think you’ve seen everything the Lescar has to offer, you turn a corner and find a massive function room, complete with second bar.

The Lescar’s menu has a very rustic, pub rub grub feel. All the classics are present and accounted for: cottage pie, burgers, fish and chips, sausage and mash, and steak. However, the Lescar put a little twist on these comfort food classics – here, the fish is done in tarragon batter, and the mash is made from celeriac.

In addition to the pub grub mains, the Lescar also offers a variety of sharing platters, plus a good selection of small dishes ‘to start, snack or share.’ I’ve ordered a few things from the ‘start, snack, share’ menu when I’m suffering from the beer munchies, and I’ve always been impressed. I can highly recommend the salt and pepper squid, which the Lescar serves with a tangy and delicious lime mayonnaise (£5.25).

The Lescar also have a Saturday brunch menu, which I’m desperate to try. Again, it’s classic comfort food with a gastro pub twist – the boiled egg soldiers are served with bacon jam, and the Lescar’s version of mushrooms on toast is Paris Brown, Flat and Oyster mushrooms served on rye with stilton cream.

The Lescar have a lot to offer, but on this particular day it was all about the Sunday lunch. This is something I never really cook for myself, so Sunday lunch out always feels like a special treat.

The Lescar offers the usual trio of meats (pork beef, and chicken) plus the obligatory nut roast vegetarian option. I opted for the veggie nut roast (£9.75) which according to the menu is made from cashews, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, cheddar, veggies and herbs.

My nut roast Sunday dinner came with veggies, stuffing, roasties, Yorkshire pud, and gravy. Don’t you just love the sight of a big plateful of Sunday dinner?

lescar sunday lunch

It’s amazing the difference good gravy makes to a Sunday dinner. The Lescar’s gravy had the perfect consistency, not too thick and not too thin, and it was really tasty. If I could make gravy half as good as this, I wouldn’t have to go out for my Sunday lunch!

The vegetables were perfectly cooked, and I loved the combination of leeks, carrots and courgettes. The roast potatoes were crispy and salty on the outside, but light and fluffy on the inside – exactly what you want from a roastie. The Yorkshire pudding was big, misshapen and ugly, the surefire sign of a homemade Yorkshire pud. It also tasted even better for having been sat soaking in that delicious gravy.

The nut roast had a nice, herby taste that reminded me of stuffing, and it was packed with nuts. The portion was also very generous, but it’s a good job because the nut roast had been overcooked to the point where I could only get my knife through the bit in the middle!

Luckily, this was such a big plateful that after eating the middle of my nut roast, plus all the trimmings, I was pleasantly full and still felt like I’d got good value for money.

I’d recommend this Sunday roast to all the veggies out there – although hopefully your nut roast won’t have spent quite so much time in the oven as mine!

At the other end of the table, it was a less traditional Sunday lunch: a West Country beef burger, sesame seed brioche bun, melted Taw valley cheddar and fries (£9.25) with smoked bacon (an extra £1.25).

the lescar burger

This is more of a gourmet burger, as oppose to the weird-combination-of-toppings burger that places like the Harley and Bungalows and Bears specialise in. The brioche bun was tasty, the meat was nicely cooked, and the smoked bacon lived up to its name, packing a really strong, smoky flavour. My Sunday lunch buddy was also impressed by how much bacon he got for £1.25.

It may not be your traditional Sunday lunch, but this burger got a big thumbs up nevertheless!

We left the Lescar pleasantly full, and plotting return visits so we could sample the Saturday brunch menu, plus an afternoon drinking session with added bar snacks. You know a place is doing something right, when you’re planning the next visit on your way home!

The Lescar serve up filling, tasty comfort food in a warm and welcoming environment that’s perfect for this time of year. If you’re craving pub grub, real ale, and relaxed surroundings, then it’s well worth paying the Lescar a visit.

three-and-a-half

Bungalows and Bears

November 2, 2014 at 4:09 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | 2 Comments
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If you love burgers (and really, who doesn’t?) then you’re spoilt for choice at the moment, as there’s currently a tonne of Sheffield venues doing some really unusual things with this fast food favourite. Bungalows and Bears on Division Street is one of these places.

At Bungalows and Bears you can grab a classic bacon and cheese burger, or branch out and try burgers filled with everything from peanut butter to Monster Munch crisps!

If that’s not adventurous enough for you, Bungalows and Bears also offer a wide selection of additional toppings, ranging from smoked chipotle jam, to sauerkraut, mac and cheese, houmous, and much more, all a snip at an extra £1. You can even build your own burger by choosing your patty (either beef, char-grilled chicken, or a vegetarian ‘hippy’ patty) and then adding whatever toppings take your fancy.

Bungalows and Bears do other food besides burgers, but the burger section is so massive that I never even get around to looking at the rest of the menu! And this particular day was no different, because it was burgers all around at our table.

One of the things I love about Bungalows and Bears’ burger menu, is how vegetarian friendly it is. Vegetarians can choose from a trio of meat-free burgers, or you can build your own veggie burger by selecting a ‘Hippy’ spinach and lentil patty, and then piling on the toppings.

In the end, I opted for one of Bungalows and Bears’ own creations; a Shroomaloomi burger (£7.45) of flat field mushroom and halloumi.

Shroomaloomi Bungalows and Bears

My first challenge was working out how to tackle this king-size burger! The field mushroom was also very slippery, so whenever I tried to cut my burger, the mushroom slid away from me, taking the rest of the toppings with it. In the end I gave up and got stuck in with my hands. It was messy, but this burger is worth getting messy for.

Whatever halloumi Bungalows and Bears use, it’s the best I’ve ever tasted! Bungalows aren’t stingy with their delicious halloumi either, as my Shroomaloomi was generously filled with thick wedges of the stuff.

This is one incredibly filling burger, but it’s also too good to waste, so I battled through and polished off every last bite of my burger.

All of Bungalows and Bears’ burgers are served with a portion of chunky, skin-on chips, which are my favourite kind of chips. They also put a selection of hot sauces on each table, so I got to splash three kinds of Tabasco onto my skin-on chips, which is pretty much my idea of heaven. I was already completely stuffed from my burger, but the chips were just too good to waste; I couldn’t resist eating them all!

This is one of the best burger and chips combos I’ve had in a long time. In fact, it’s almost as good as the Wick’s mushroom burger, which is my favourite Sheffield burger. My only complaint is that my Shroomaloomi burger arrived lukewarm rather than hot, so it went cold long before I’d finished eating it.

Also arriving at our table was a Ruby Jean’s burger (£8.95) of smoked bacon, emmental and onion rings.

Ruby Jean's

The Ruby Jean’s was every bit as big as my Shroomaloomi. The combination of smoked bacon, emmental and onion rings worked really well, and the onion rings themselves were nice and crispy, without being greasy.

The only complaint was that the burger wasn’t cheesy enough; my friend would have preferred more emmental on his burger, or maybe even a stronger-tasting cheese altogether.

Once again, this is a massive portion of burger, chips, and hot sauce that was just too good to waste. They followed my example and stuffed themselves silly, rather than leaving any food on their plate.

The third burger to arrive at our table wasn’t your typical burger – it was a burger filled with peanut butter and a fried egg (£7.95).

fried egg and peanut butter

If you’ve never had peanut butter with egg on a burger before, trust me it’s not as disgusting as it sounds! Peanut butter and fried egg is one of those strange combinations that actually really works, especially as the runny yolk helps combat the dryness of the peanut butter, to make one very tasty burger.

If you’re open minded about food, then this is something you need to try!

If you think a peanut butter and egg burger is strange, then how about a burger of emmental and pickled onion Monster Munch crisps (£8.45), with a bonus deep-fried pickle on the side (£1)?

Monster Munch Bungs and Bears

The burger sauce had a nice tang to it, and the distinctive taste of pickled onion Monster Munch works really well as a burger filling (who knew?) Bungalows and Bears really do have a knack for these quirky combinations!

My friend also loved the deep-fried pickle they’d ordered on the side, as they could still taste that distinctive, sour tang of pickle through the batter.

If you order a burger at Bungalows and Bears, you can be certain of two things: you’re going to get very full, and very messy. These burgers aren’t for the faint hearted!

You can’t knock Bungalows and Bears for the choice they provide, particularly as this choice includes so many weird and wonderful combinations. Even if you’re a vegetarian, you’ll be spoilt for choice by their burger menu, which is a very rare thing!

The negatives? Personally, I’m not a fan of the way Bungalows and Bears serve their burgers in plastic baskets. I find this makes food more difficult to eat, especially when the food in question is a precariously-stacked burger. The drinks at Bungalows are also on the expensive side, so if you’re counting the pennies you may want to order a soft drink with your burger. However, when it comes to the actual food, I can’t fault them!

Finally, if you love a bargain then be sure to visit Bungalows and Bears on a Tuesday, when they do a 2-4-1 deal on all burgers. Considering how big and filling these burgers are, this is fantastic value for money.

four-stars

The Harley

May 13, 2014 at 8:08 pm | Posted in Pub Grub | 2 Comments
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Sheffield burger fans are spoilt for choice at the moment, with The Wick at Both Ends, Bungalows and Bears, and the Mud Crab all serving up top-notch burgers. Between them, this trio offers everything from gourmet burgers, to greasy-but-great, American style burgers, and even a “build your own” experience, where you can concoct some truly freakish (but still tasty) creations. But, if you like your burgers super-sized, calorie-packed, and stuffed with so-wrong-yet-so-right toppings, then the the Harley on Glossop Road is the place to go. Where else can you get a burger with mac and cheese as a filling?

When they’re not serving up big, fat burgers, the Harley specialises in loud bands, and late Friday and Saturday nights. It’s no surprise then, that the venue looks a bit rough around the edges in the daylight, but don’t let this put you off.

When we visited on a Saturday lunchtime, there was just enough people to create an atmosphere, without it being tricky to find a decent seat. In fact, we managed to snag one of the Harley’s big, antique-style sofas, and settled down to get better acquainted with the menu.

When it comes to food, the Harley specialise in two things: burgers and breakfast. We may have missed the breakfast sitting, but I still couldn’t resist taking a peek at the morning menu. In addition to the usual full English, the Harley serve up an epic-sounding McBuffting; a bacon or mushroom patty, combined with American cheese, a fried egg, and “techno” burger sauce. The McBuffting sounds like the kind of breakfast that’s guaranteed to annihilate even the most crippling of hangovers!

When it comes to burgers, you can “build your own,” thanks to the Harley’s vast selection of additional toppings, which cover everything from bacon, to deep-fried jalapenos, to chorizo and apple jam. If you’re not feeling particularly creative, you can pick one of the Harley’s own concoctions from the main menu. All of these burgers are crammed with so many added extras, they actually sound a bit scary on paper: case in point, the “Return of the Mac,” which boasts two bacon patties, homemade pesto, Harley house relish, and mac and cheese.

With so much to choose from, I’m a bit ashamed to admit that I built my own, rather boring burger: a Double Mushroom Burger (£5.50) with a Montery Jack cheese topping (an extra 85p). However, in my defence I did also order a portion of Jalapeno Business Fries (£4.75) to go with my mushroom-and-cheese burger.

I love mushroom burgers, but when I bit into the Harley’s big, tasty-looking burger, the mushroom patty wasn’t what I’d been expecting. It had an unusual, fine texture that reminded me more of ground-up beef, than your typical chunky veggie burger. The patty had a nice, smoky flavour and was very filling, but the crumbly texture of the patty wasn’t really to my taste.

Harley mushroom burger

Thankfully, things improved the second I caught sight of my order of Jalapeno Business Fries.

Harley Business Fries

The biggest compliment I can give these fries, is that they taste even better than they look (yep, such a thing is possible).

The Harley’s Jalapeno Business Fries are a truly super-sized portion of spicy fries, smothered in a delicious trio of guacamole, sour cream, and Harley House Relish. Just in case lashings of Cajun seasoning, crispy-skinned fries, and three kinds of sauce leave you thinking hmmm, but something’s still missing, the Harley throw some hot, gooey cheese into the mix, and top the whole thing off with a grilled jalapeno.

Guacamole is one of my least favourite sauces, but I actually enjoyed the Harley’s guacamole, as it was fresh and tasty, and didn’t have that slimy texture that guacamole sometimes has. However, the Harley’s relish was my favourite of the three sauces, as it had a creamy texture and a lingering spicy, smoky aftertaste. The Harley need to add this relish to their list of optional extra burger toppings, and pronto! It’s one of those sauces that, once tasted, you want to add to everything.

The Business Fries were finished off with a whole chilli, which had been grilled so the flesh was squishy and sweet. Not merely an eye-catching garnish, this chilli is mild and tasty enough to eat whole, which I gladly did (hey, you’ve gotta get your 5 a day, right?)

A portion of Business Fries is big enough to be a meal in itself, or it’d make a fantastic side order to share between two very hungry people. Either way, this is definitely something I’d order again.

At the other end of the table, my dining companion tucked into a Pig Daddy Kane, which is a burger of two beef patties, plus pulled pork, cheese, Kraken BBQ sauce, and chorizo and apple jam (£7.95).

Harley Pig Daddy Kane

They particularly enjoyed the pulled pork, which was flakey and moist, as well as the sticky, chorizo and apple jam, and the yummy Kraken BBQ sauce. The Harley’s menu includes a side order of Pig Pimpin’ Fries, which comes with pulled pork-smoked cheese sauce, as well as more of that Kraken BBQ sauce, so I think these fries may be on the cards, the next time we visit the Harley.

The Harley is a no-nonsense kind of venue, where the menu encourages you to take your average, run-of-the-mill burger, and then add some pulled pork, a couple of different kinds of cheese, four kinds of sauce, pulled pork, deep-fried jalapenos, and whatever else takes your fancy. Fine dining it ain’t, but sometimes you have a craving for a big, fat burger, with lots of added extras.

The Harley is one of the more unusual burger menus you’ll find in Sheffield and, luckily for me, they offer another veggie option: the Falafel burger. I’m looking forward to visiting again and trying some more of their menu – with a portion of Business Fries on the side, of course!

rating-3-star

The Wick at Both Ends

April 17, 2014 at 6:49 pm | Posted in Pub Grub, Restaurants | 6 Comments
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Let me start by saying that I’d no intention of writing about the Wick at Both Ends again (or at least not until their next menu change) but sometimes, a meal is just so good, you can’t resist raving about it. So, following a too-good-not-to-shout-about meal at the Wick with some friends this week, I’m spreading some more Wick at Both Ends love.

After branching out and trying something new on my previous visit, this time I couldn’t resist ordering my old favourite, the Wick’s mushroom burger (£7.95). I wasn’t alone, as two of my friends couldn’t resist the burger menu either, and opted for a pair of beef burgers (£7.95 each).

Whether you’re a beef or a mushroom fan, burger lovers can mix things up with a range of additional toppings, all priced at an extra 95p each. All of the Wick’s burgers come with homemade relish and some seriously chunky chips.

First to arrive at our table, was a double act of beef burgers.

Wick beef burger with bacon

My first burger-loving friend opted for an extra topping of two rashers of bacon (a snip at 95p) and creamy farmhouse brie (again, 95p more). These fillings were so good, they deserve their own close up.

Wick at Both Ends burger

As already mentioned, all the Wick’s burgers come with chips and homemade relish. The chips are chunky enough to be wedges, crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside, and served in a cute little bucket, while the relish is wonderfully rustic, with that strong tang of fresh tomato, and a spicy kick. Exactly what you want when you’re tucking into a burger!

My second burger-buddy opted for a Y-Fenni Mustard Ale cheese topping (yep, you guessed it, an extra 95p). This cheese had a fiery mustard flavour, although apparently they struggled to taste the ale, which was a bit disappointing.

Wick beef burger

Finally, my mushroom burger arrived – and I can confirm that it’s still pretty much my favourite burger ever. Sometimes, when a restaurant offers a veggie burger, they simply swap the meat patty and fillings for a veggie-friendly patty, but the Wick is one of the few establishments that treats the much-maligned veggie burger as a meal in its own right, rather than just an “alternative” for those who don’t eat meat.

The Wick’s veggie burger takes the form of a whole field mushroom smothered in crunchy celeriac and cabbage slaw. This is the sort of creamy, rustic slaw that’ll have you swearing off shop-bought condiments and Googling “homemade coleslaw recipe” – probably before you’ve even finished your burger! The Wick aren’t stingy with the slaw either, so keeping it inside the burger is bit of a challenge, but it’s well worth the trouble.

Basically, I love everything about this burger.

Wick mushroom burger

But, this Wick trip wasn’t just about pigging out on gourmet burgers and chips, as the final meal arriving at our table was a very intriguing-looking roast cauliflower and broccoli dish, served with a quinoa, radish, almond and new potato salad (£7.95).

Roast cauliflower, broccoli and quinoa salad

The cauliflower did have some burnt edges, but thanks to that deliciously nutty, slow-roasted flavour, this didn’t matter – apparently even the blackened bits were tasty! Who knew the humble cauliflower could taste so good?

Not content with taking one everyday vegetable to the next level, this salad also does something special with shooting broccoli. The shoots were tender, juicy and perfectly cooked, so my friend couldn’t decide which she enjoyed the most: the broccoli or the cauliflower (and how often do you hear someone debating that?)

The quinoa was fluffy, the almonds were toasted and tasty, and the new potatoes brought some satisfying starch and carbs to the meal. These rather random-sounding foodstuffs turned out to be the perfect combination of textures and flavours.

The whole thing was finished off with a dollop of cauliflower puree. Like the roasted cauliflower and broccoli, this vegetable puree is far nicer than it sounds, and is further proof that you can do wonderful things with even the most boring, everyday veggies. The only complaint was that the portion of puree was too small. More, please!

If you fancy a change, this unusual salad is definitely worth a spin. I’d enjoyed my goat’s cheese and beetroot salad during my previous visit, but this looked far more substantial. I’ll definitely be trying this cauliflower, broccoli, and quinoa salad for myself in the future!

The Wick at Both Ends never fails to impress. If you haven’t been yet, then to put it simply: you’re missing out on a great venue, great cocktails, and some truly first class food!

4 and a half

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